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Christi

United Kingdom
3893 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  05:26:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit Christi's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Osel,

p.s.

Constant name-dropping and harping on about secret practices and why one is the only person in the world who is special enough to recieve them, are often symptoms of deep rooted insecurities and inner pain. Simple meditation, practiced in moderation (20 minutes twice a day) is really the best way to bring these things to the surface and let them clear.

Of course, discussing these things with friends, or here in the forum can also help to clear up issues that otherwise could take lifetimes to get over.

Wishing you all the best.

Christi
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chinna

United Kingdom
241 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  06:21:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit chinna's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by Konchok Ösel Dorje

Chinna, I do appreciate what you are saying. I think you all misunderstand what this debate between Alwayson and myself was about. It was my attempt to get him to stop reifying a set pattern to buddhahood. My arguments to him were exactly what you are saying to me, that the nature of mind is beyond concepts. His point was the the nature of mind can only be discovered via Togal, which is not a concept, it's a technique of sun gazing. Because I practice Essence Mahamudra, there is no Togal. The practice is Mahamudra, which is also not a concept, it's a technique. Then, we got into a debate about whether Mahamudra is a technique or just another name for Buddhahood. I also tried to get him to understand that in Togal one does not merely relax into shamatha, but one must rest in rigpa, another name for the "natural state"/mahamudra. I was trying to get him to see the way one can look at these practices in a way that transcends the lineages, by taking manifestations as ripa as the path. We had this debate, because he was using the language of the Sakya lineage. I was using the language of the Kagyu lineage. Once we understood each other, we had some discussions over email and the debate was over.

Then, because this discussion between he and I was very technical, from teachings with which you perhaps you are not familiar, some of you became frustrated. I'm sorry about that.

However, Chinna, Christi, I don't reify concepts. I am not engaging in ad hominem attacks. I'm not trying to tell you what to think or act as some kind of authority about what the Buddha really taught.

So Chinna you can stop reifying the concept that people don't need teachers. Maybe Maharshi didn't need one, but I'm sure that's not gonna work for you. If it did, you wouldn't be on the internet, you'd be at your ashram with your wise students. The fact is that almost everyone does need a teacher, and most will not get anywhere by just inquiring into "I am."

Christi can stop reifying the concept that the Buddha was just the man Shakyamuni. There have been numerous buddhas who have lived since then and who live today, and have left excellent methods for the swift attainment of buddhahood, methods that take into account the relative needs of the students with varying levels of capacity, and not some naive, one size fits all, overly simplistic method.

Perhaps you all need to climb outside of your little boxes from Advaita and Theravada and see what the Vajrayana masters have to say and have to teach. Why not? Surely you are not attached to 20 years of conditioning.



I have never suggested that 'people don't need teachers' nor suggested that 'just inquiring into 'I am'' is the only way. My own history didn't follow such a path, either, it was much less easily defined.

We all ultimately find the perfect path for ourselves, the perfect antidote for our weaknesses as much as the perfect vehicle for our strengths. The path focused on complex secrets, hierarchies and empowerments finds a different disciple to the path focused on simplicity, austerity, direct encounter with the absolute, as does the path of immersion in compassionate action with the poorest and the lowest, for example. Each ishta-marga reveals its disciples, simply by what we are attracted to.

Where we are in agreement is that the fastest path is faith. Faith is a great teacher, and eventually 'faith in' becomes just 'faith', indefinable but for our lack of doubt, worry, self-concern. Peace and joy are its hallmarks. And then we are home.

Whether you come quickly or slowly, by a path of showmanship or obscurity, complexity or simplicity, appetite or austerity, authority or experience, where you get to in the end, if you get to the end, is Simplicity Itself.

Peace

chinna
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gumpi

United Kingdom
546 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  06:33:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit gumpi's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Christi,

Since you studied and practiced Buddhism for such a long time, what do you think about those practices compared to AYP? And do you believe in God?
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alwayson2

USA
546 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  09:17:09 AM  Show Profile  Visit alwayson2's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Christi,

I am afraid you are reducing Buddhism to New Age "love and light" philosophy. And like typical New Age people, you are extremely judgemental.

Buddha's teaching is actually pretty hardcore. He used the ability called the Divine Eye (which I am 99.9% sure is the same as Robert Bruce's vision screen, which I DO have VERY BRIEF experience with) to visit the heavens, and many other things.

Let me ask you a question:
Do you believe we plan our lives before being born?

Edited by - alwayson2 on Aug 10 2009 09:46:40 AM
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Christi

United Kingdom
3893 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  10:16:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit Christi's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Christi,

Since you studied and practiced Buddhism for such a long time, what do you think about those practices compared to AYP? And do you believe in God?


Hi Gumpi,

Actually Buddhism is very similar to AYP, and works very well as a complementary system. The basic principles are all the same.

The Divine is not really something you can believe in, after all, how can you believe in something that you cannot even imagine? The Divine is something that you come to know more and more through direct experience as a result of engaging in spiritual practices over the long term.

Christi

Edited by - Christi on Aug 10 2009 11:15:51 AM
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Christi

United Kingdom
3893 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  11:14:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit Christi's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Alwayson,

quote:
Christi,

I am afraid you are reducing Buddhism to New Age "love and light" philosophy. And like typical New Age people, you are extremely judgemental.



I have never practiced in the New Age tradition, so I can't really comment on that. I have practiced in the Buddhist traditions for the last 20 years, and practiced yoga for the last 4 years alongside my Buddhist practices. I experienced the opening of the heart through Buddhist practices alone. Compassion, spontaneous joy and sympathetic joy all arise due to the opening of the heart.

Divine love is something that is experienced later when the radiant light of the body merges with bliss in samadhi.

I would advise people who are practicing in any Buddhist tradition to use these things as guidelines to see if their practice is actually bearing fruit over the long term. How much joy is arising? How much compassion is actually experienced? How much love is felt for all beings, regardless of who they are, or what they are doing? These things do not arise overnight... it can take years of practice.

But if they never arise, then the practice itself should be brought into question. Is there too much study of books going on and too little silencing of the mind? Is there too much arguing over terminology and philosophical viewpoints and too little opening of the heart? Is too much time being spent labelling things, and not enough time spent seeing the labels (all labels) fall away in silence?

From my own experience I can say that Buddhism is the path of joy, compassion, freedom and love.

Or in the language of the original texts... Mudita, Karuna, Moksha, Metta.

Christi
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Christi

United Kingdom
3893 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  11:21:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit Christi's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Always on,

quote:
Buddha's teaching is actually pretty hardcore. He used the ability called the Divine Eye (which I am 99.9% sure is the same as Robert Bruce's vision screen, which I DO have VERY BRIEF experience with) to visit the heavens, and many other things.


p.s.

Visiting the heavens is cool, but it does not, of itself, bring liberation. More places to go, more people to see... more things to let go of.

quote:
Do you believe we plan our lives before being born?


p.p.s

I would say don't speculate about these things... simply practice, and enjoy.

Christi

Edited by - Christi on Aug 10 2009 11:26:05 AM
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alwayson2

USA
546 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  12:09:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit alwayson2's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by Christi
Visiting the heavens is cool, but it does not, of itself, bring liberation. More places to go, more people to see... more things to let go of.





but another purpose of using what I call the vision screen, and what Buddha called the Divine Eye (divya cakkus) is actually to trace reincarnations and karma of oneself and others.

The Buddha was pretty adamant that you could only gain personal experience with reincarnation and karma via the use of this very specific psychic ability.

In other words, some of the major tenets of Buddhism derive solely from the historical Buddha playing around with this particular psychic ability.

Edited by - alwayson2 on Aug 10 2009 12:19:34 PM
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Konchok Ösel Dorje

USA
545 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  12:26:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Konchok Ösel Dorje's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Christi, The bottom line is that I never attacked you. When someone challenges my views I don't get upset. There are points and counterpoints, that's all. I don't take these things personally. You were the one rattling on about your 20 years of experience. So I retorted with my vast experience.

This discussion was about the finer points of the Rainbow Body, which is a teaching of the Vajrayana scriptures.

Your advice comes from AYP and Theravada. All that basic advice is wonderful. It's helpful. But it is not relevant to what this thread was supposed to be about. Now that this thread is about who can give the best pithy folksy wisdom sayings, it's become futile to continue this discussion, probably because there is nothing left really to clarify any further.

My point about sensitivity is that one can discuss things without getting personal. One can debate forcefully, without it getting personal.

Any you Christi, remain the wise elder, the one who can turn any discussion into a medium for you to prescribed, advise and control. Now that you have so skillfully helped me tremendously by discovering my deep seated issue, perhaps I can help you look into yours, your need to control the conversation and make it yours.

PS

Silent meditation is not ADP, Advanced Dharma Practice. It is beginner meditation.
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Christi

United Kingdom
3893 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  12:40:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit Christi's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Alwayson,
quote:
but another purpose of using what I call the vision screen, and what Buddha called the Divine Eye (divya cakkus) is actually to trace reincarnations and karma of oneself and others.

The Buddha was pretty adamant that you could only gain personal experience with reincarnation and karma via the use of this very specific psychic ability.

In other words, some of the major tenets of Buddhism derive solely from the historical Buddha playing around with this particular psychic ability.


But there is still no need to speculate over whether it is possible or not, or whether it happens or not. There is something called trikaladrishti, which is the seeing of the three times (which Osel referred to above as omniscience). It is something that comes in one of the higher jana states, when it is possible to see one's own present life, and also one's previous and future lives. Seeing these things does give you a new angle on karma... it opens up the field so to speak. But enlightenment isn't about seeing past and future lives, or about travelling in the heavenly realms, or about understanding how karma works. It is about transcending karma, and realizing the radiant joy and peace of divine freedom.

The historical Buddha taught that freedom comes from transcending the process of being born in each moment, which leads to the transcendence of birth and death altogether. A Buddha, is one who has stopped playing the game.... he/ she is no longer flailing around in the water, but is sitting on the bank, the veil of delusion having been lifted.

Christi



Edited by - Christi on Aug 10 2009 12:56:36 PM
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Konchok Ösel Dorje

USA
545 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  12:54:40 PM  Show Profile  Visit Konchok Ösel Dorje's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by chinna

[quote]Originally posted by Konchok Ösel Dorje
I have never suggested that 'people don't need teachers' nor suggested that 'just inquiring into 'I am'' is the only way. My own history didn't follow such a path, either, it was much less easily defined.

We all ultimately find the perfect path for ourselves, the perfect antidote for our weaknesses as much as the perfect vehicle for our strengths. The path focused on complex secrets, hierarchies and empowerments finds a different disciple to the path focused on simplicity, austerity, direct encounter with the absolute, as does the path of immersion in compassionate action with the poorest and the lowest, for example. Each ishta-marga reveals its disciples, simply by what we are attracted to.

Where we are in agreement is that the fastest path is faith. Faith is a great teacher, and eventually 'faith in' becomes just 'faith', indefinable but for our lack of doubt, worry, self-concern. Peace and joy are its hallmarks. And then we are home.

Whether you come quickly or slowly, by a path of showmanship or obscurity, complexity or simplicity, appetite or austerity, authority or experience, where you get to in the end, if you get to the end, is Simplicity Itself.

Peace

chinna




Chinna, your points are well received, well considered, understood, agreed with. My discussion with HH Taklung Matul Rinpoche was about the use of elaborate and hierarchical teachings as way to attract a certain kind of student. The teachings are ornamented to attract certain kinds of people into a state of simplicity.

At the same time, having the nature of mind pointed out is quite an experience. The skill of allowing negative emotions and discursive thoughts to self-liberate is really useful and awesome. It's an amazing shortcut to the path of effortlessness. Sure it might take a year or so to stabilize. The Mahasiddha approach deserves careful inspection. Those karmically connected with it will benefit immeasurably.
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Konchok Ösel Dorje

USA
545 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  12:58:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit Konchok Ösel Dorje's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by Christi

Hi Alwayson,
quote:
but another purpose of using what I call the vision screen, and what Buddha called the Divine Eye (divya cakkus) is actually to trace reincarnations and karma of oneself and others.

The Buddha was pretty adamant that you could only gain personal experience with reincarnation and karma via the use of this very specific psychic ability.

In other words, some of the major tenets of Buddhism derive solely from the historical Buddha playing around with this particular psychic ability.


But there is still no need to speculate over whether it is possible or not, or whether it happens or not. There is something called trikaladrishti, which is the seeing of the three times (which Osel referred to above as omniscience). It is something that comes in one of the higher jana states, when it is possible to see one's own present life, and also one's previous and future lives. Seeing these things does give you a new angle on karma... it opens up the field so to speak. But enlightenment isn't about seeing past and future lives, or about travelling in the heavenly realms, or about understanding how karma works. It is about transcending karma, and realizing the radiant joy and peace of divine freedom.

The historical Buddha taught that freedom comes from transcending the process of being born in each moment, which leads to the transcendence of birth and death altogether. A Buddha, is one who has stopped playing the game.... he/ she is no longer flailing around in the water, but is sitting on the bank, the veil of delusion having been lifted.

Christi






Your comments don't match up the Buddha's discourse on "The Fruits of the Homeless Life." Perhaps we would all benefit from your comments on that specific Sutta of the Pali Canon.
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Christi

United Kingdom
3893 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  1:30:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit Christi's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Osel,

quote:

But there is still no need to speculate over whether it is possible or not, or whether it happens or not. There is something called trikaladrishti, which is the seeing of the three times (which Osel referred to above as omniscience). It is something that comes in one of the higher jana states, when it is possible to see one's own present life, and also one's previous and future lives. Seeing these things does give you a new angle on karma... it opens up the field so to speak. But enlightenment isn't about seeing past and future lives, or about travelling in the heavenly realms, or about understanding how karma works. It is about transcending karma, and realizing the radiant joy and peace of divine freedom.

The historical Buddha taught that freedom comes from transcending the process of being born in each moment, which leads to the transcendence of birth and death altogether. A Buddha, is one who has stopped playing the game.... he/ she is no longer flailing around in the water, but is sitting on the bank, the veil of delusion having been lifted.

Christi




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Your comments don't match up the Buddha's discourse on "The Fruits of the Homeless Life." Perhaps we would all benefit from your comments on that specific Sutta of the Pali Canon


In the Samannyaphala sutta (The text you refer to) the seeing of one's own past, present and future lives is described as a fruit of the Holy life. There are many fruits of the completative life described. States of joy and ecstasy are described, as well as many siddhis (supernatural powers). These are all things that may come on the path, but they are not the goal of the path. The goal of the path is enlightenment, which is a never-ending journey.

Christi
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Konchok Ösel Dorje

USA
545 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  1:46:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Konchok Ösel Dorje's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by Christi

Hi Osel,

quote:

But there is still no need to speculate over whether it is possible or not, or whether it happens or not. There is something called trikaladrishti, which is the seeing of the three times (which Osel referred to above as omniscience). It is something that comes in one of the higher jana states, when it is possible to see one's own present life, and also one's previous and future lives. Seeing these things does give you a new angle on karma... it opens up the field so to speak. But enlightenment isn't about seeing past and future lives, or about travelling in the heavenly realms, or about understanding how karma works. It is about transcending karma, and realizing the radiant joy and peace of divine freedom.

The historical Buddha taught that freedom comes from transcending the process of being born in each moment, which leads to the transcendence of birth and death altogether. A Buddha, is one who has stopped playing the game.... he/ she is no longer flailing around in the water, but is sitting on the bank, the veil of delusion having been lifted.

Christi




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Your comments don't match up the Buddha's discourse on "The Fruits of the Homeless Life." Perhaps we would all benefit from your comments on that specific Sutta of the Pali Canon


In the Samannyaphala sutta (The text you refer to) the seeing of one's own past, present and future lives is described as a fruit of the Holy life. There are many fruits of the completative life described. States of joy and ecstasy are described, as well as many siddhis (supernatural powers). These are all things that may come on the path, but they are not the goal of the path. The goal of the path is enlightenment, which is a never-ending journey.

Christi



Nice work with the ancient language skills. You are well read with Pali. I hear the message loud and clear, twenty-years and all that.

Where in the Pali Canon does the Buddha say enlightenment is a never-ending journey?

Edited by - Konchok Ösel Dorje on Aug 10 2009 1:52:39 PM
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Christi

United Kingdom
3893 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  2:22:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Christi's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Osel,
quote:

Nice work with the ancient language skills. You are well read with Pali. I hear the message loud and clear, twenty-years and all that.

Where in the Pali Canon does the Buddha say enlightenment is a never-ending journey?




Where in the Cannon does he say that the journey has an end?

Where is he now?

Christi
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cosmic

USA
821 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  2:56:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Peace, my friends. There is a path for everyone. Let us pray that every being finds theirs, and that Truth is revealed to us in our hearts. And respect each other along the way.

With Love
cosmic
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Konchok Ösel Dorje

USA
545 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  3:03:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Konchok Ösel Dorje's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by Christi

Hi Osel,
quote:

Nice work with the ancient language skills. You are well read with Pali. I hear the message loud and clear, twenty-years and all that.

Where in the Pali Canon does the Buddha say enlightenment is a never-ending journey?




Where in the Cannon does he say that the journey has an end?

Where is he now?

Christi



Where does it say it's a journey?

The Buddha is the nature of mind.

Edited by - Konchok Ösel Dorje on Aug 10 2009 3:11:21 PM
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chinna

United Kingdom
241 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  5:02:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit chinna's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by Konchok Ösel Dorje

Where does it say it's a journey?

The Buddha is the nature of mind.



YES!

chinna
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divinefurball

USA
138 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  5:37:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
7/16/09 - Main Lesson 348 - A Journey from Here to Here
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Kirtanman

USA
1651 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  5:44:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit Kirtanman's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Christi, Osel, AlwaysOn, Divine Furball, Cosmic, Chinna & All,

Prior to reading this thread, and not being too familiar with Buddhist texts, I was not familiar with the Samannaphala Sutta.

It is indeed a beautiful and profound set of sacred teachings; I found this passage from the Intermediate Section on Virtue to be particularly poignant:

"'You understand this doctrine and discipline? I'm the one who understands this doctrine and discipline. How could you understand this doctrine and discipline? You're practicing wrongly. I'm practicing rightly. I'm being consistent. You're not. What should be said first you said last. What should be said last you said first. What you took so long to think out has been refuted. Your doctrine has been overthrown. You're defeated. Go and try to salvage your doctrine; extricate yourself if you can!' — he abstains from debates such as these. This, too, is part of his virtue."

Source: Samannaphala Sutta


Overall, it is a very sublime and beautiful text.

As I believe most of you know, I enjoy poignant teaching wherever it may be found, and I also feel moved to share this lyric from the recent song Unity, by Trevor Hall (w/Matisyahu) --

"Love All, Serve All and Create No Sorrow."

... a single, sutra-like statement which is easily the equal of any other (actual) sutra or sutta, in any language.

I am truly grateful beyond words, that via the light and power of all sacred pointers to truth (whether found in Sanskrit or Pali, song lyrics, online forums, or a spontaneous hug - or even in the pure light of loving awareness, reading these words ) we'll all finally realize where the loving we're seeking is actually shining *from*.


_/\_



Intending The Light of This Loving For All,

Kirtanman




Edited by - Kirtanman on Aug 10 2009 6:08:48 PM
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Kirtanman

USA
1651 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  6:07:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Kirtanman's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
This Samannaphala Sutta is seriously good stuff:

‘ “Therefore there is no such thing as saying: ‘By this discipline or practice or austerity or holy life I will bring my un-ripened kamma to fruition, or I will gradually make this ripened kamma go away.’ Neither of these things is possible, because pleasure and pain have been measured out with a measure limited by the round of birth-and-death, and there is neither increase nor decrease, neither excellence nor inferiority. Just as a ball of string when thrown runs till it is all unraveled, so fools and wise run on and circle round till they make and end of suffering.

Wow.

Hardcore, indeed!

It's like there's *no* place at all for the conceptual-sufferer, the ego-dream, to run, to hide, to do .... to not do ....

Just a sheer, infinite drop-off of non-conceptuality at every turn ...

... until the ego-dream not only has no choice ... but no ego to dream at all ... until all that's left is (hey ... wow .... non-imagine this! -->) ... to let the dream dissolve ... to stop conceiving of the conceiver of the concepts; to end suffering in the last way the mind could *ever* dream of: by ending the concept of the limited sufferER.



"Love all, serve all, and create no sorrow."

Who knew?

Who didn't know?

"Nah, this can't be reality!! It's WAY too beautiful!!"



In The Peace Of The Fullness Of The Heart Of It All,

Kirtanman
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Konchok Ösel Dorje

USA
545 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  7:54:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit Konchok Ösel Dorje's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Kirtanman. The quotes you refer to are the about the nature of mind. No method reveals. Which is why Dzogchen and Mahamudra are described as method of no method, or non-concentration of "no attachment and no fixation." This applies to enlightenment as realization.

Then, there is a next phase, beyond realization. That entails fully purifying the elements. When one has no attachment, like the Buddha said, the string unravels. So too, once we are realized, our elements will fully purify, after some time. Once they are fully purified, one has "achieved buddhahood." Once the karma is fully cleansed, what remains is our true nature, a buddha's body.

How much time is the issue that is relative to the practitioner. It depends and the amount of karmic grime that has built up. Here, method does not touch the realization. It is the "pressure wash" of Bhastrika. In Vajrayana, there are many other similar and not so similar methods of pressure wash. That's what this thread is about, not realization, but fully completed buddhahood.
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cosmic

USA
821 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  8:49:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by Kirtanman

I also feel moved to share this lyric from the recent song Unity, by Trevor Hall (w/Matisyahu) --

"Love All, Serve All and Create No Sorrow."


K-Man, thanks for pulling through once again on the Matisyahu front. I wasn't aware of this song til you mentioned it, then found this amazing live performance of it:

Unity Live

Here's another beautiful lyric from it:

"No more you and me. No more they and we. Just Unity"

Peace
cosmic
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Kirtanman

USA
1651 Posts

Posted - Aug 10 2009 :  10:05:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit Kirtanman's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by cosmic

quote:
Originally posted by Kirtanman

I also feel moved to share this lyric from the recent song Unity, by Trevor Hall (w/Matisyahu) --

"Love All, Serve All and Create No Sorrow."


K-Man, thanks for pulling through once again on the Matisyahu front. I wasn't aware of this song til you mentioned it, then found this amazing live performance of it:

Unity Live

Here's another beautiful lyric from it:

"No more you and me. No more they and we. Just Unity"

Peace
cosmic



WOW!

Thank YOU, Cosmic!!

Beautiful!!

"I just want to melt down in this grace // and drift into this sacred place."

Exactly.

The challenge is not that that all this is too complicated, but rather that it's far too simple for thinking-mind to accept.

And (for anyone who may watch listen) ... the musical off-key-ness at points may be a little hard on the ears .... but what the song lacks {at points} in vocal harmony, it more than makes up for in lyrical beauty and authentic bhakti!

Intending Awareness of the Song of the Peace of Reality for All,

Kirtanman

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Christi

United Kingdom
3893 Posts

Posted - Aug 11 2009 :  6:45:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Christi's Homepage  Reply with Quote  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Osel,

quote:

Where does it say it's a journey?

The Buddha is the nature of mind.


One of the meanings of Dharma is way, or path. Even today the various schools of Buddhism are described as "vehicles" as they are designed to carry you along the path of awakening. The Pali for vehicle is yana, as in Hinayana, Mahayana and Vajrayana.

There are many different definitions of the word "Buddha". Essentially it is the past participle of the root verb Budh, to be awake. So it means "awakened" or "one who is awakened". The realization of the true nature of mind is one of the stages on the path of awakening (Dharma). The transition from the physical body to the body of divine light, also called the rainbow body, is a transition that occurs further down the river. Another stage on the journey.

Even once the rainbow body has been achieved, there is still a lot of work to do, in terms of service and teaching. People who inhabit only the rainbow body teach in silence by radiating the energy of divine love.

Christi
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